The 12 Best Kettlebells for At-Home Strength Training

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A kettlebell is a type of free weight, but it looks a bit different than your everyday dumbbell. This strength-training favorite consists of a cast iron, composite, or sand-filled ball with a curved handle, giving it a shape reminiscent of a vintage bowling bag.

According to certified personal trainer Dianna Falzarano, there are lots of benefits to using free weights like kettlebells. "You can do the workout anywhere," she tells Byrdie, explaining that you don't need more than a few square feet of floor space. "And unlike machines, [they] can recruit more muscle groups and give you a bigger range of motion." Over time, incorporating kettlebell workouts into your routine can improve your endurance, balance, coordination, and overall strength.

Meet the Expert

  • Dianna Falzarano is a certified Pilates instructor, personal trainer, and the owner of Dynamic Fitness LLC. Her method focuses on strength training and functional movements.
  • Morgan Coleman of Ready Set Sweat Fitness is a certified personal trainer specializing in fat-loss workouts and toning exercises.
  • Emi Gutgold is a certified fitness instructor offering virtual classes and private sessions in New York City.

We rounded up the best kettlebells for every fitness level and budget below.

Best Overall: Yes4All Combo-Coated Kettlebell Set

4.7
Yes4All Combo-Coated Kettlebell Set
What We Like
  • Multi-weight set

  • Flat bottom

  • Easy to grip

What We Don’t Like
  • Handles aren't vinyl coated

Who else recommends it? Runner's World also picked the Yes4All Combo-Coated Kettlebell Set.

What do buyers say? 85% of 3,800+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 5 stars.

Our number one pick is this multi-weight set by Yes4All. You'll get three or six kettlebells, each of a different weight ranging from 5 to 30 pounds. This allows you to start as low as you want and work your way up to a heavier option or mix up your workouts with light and heavy weights.

These kettlebells are made of traditional cast iron and coated with smooth vinyl to prevent scratches on your floors while resisting dents and punctures. We also like that the flat bottoms stop them from rolling around. While the handles aren't coated, they're made of textured steel to ensure a secure grip.

Material: Vinyl-coated cast iron, steel | Weight: 5 to 30 pounds | Colors: Black, blue, multi

Best Budget: Unipack Powder-Coated Cast Iron Kettlebell

Unipack Powder-Coated Cast Iron Kettlebell
What We Like
  • Affordable

  • Flat bottom

  • Easy to grip

What We Don’t Like
  • Sold individually

Certified personal trainer Morgan Coleman prefers weights with neoprene or powder coating. "It's more comfortable to hold," she explains. Not only is this classic black kettlebell made of easy-to-grip powder-coated cast iron, but it's also one of the most affordable options you'll find.

Material: Powder-coated cast iron | Weight: 5 to 15 pounds | Colors: Black

Best Splurge: JaxJox KettlebellConnect 2.0

JaxJox KettlebellConnect 2.0

Courtesy of Apple

What We Like
  • Adjustable

  • Bluetooth connectivity

  • On-demand classes

What We Don’t Like
  • Expensive

  • Requires subscription

If you're willing to shell out the big bucks for next-level home workouts, this high-tech, space-saving model might be worth a splurge. The KettlebellConnect 2.0 calls on a bullet-stacking system to toggle between different weights, allowing you to adjust it from 12 to 42 pounds with the press of a button. You can also sync it with the JaxJox app through Bluetooth to track your workouts and access on-demand training sessions.

Weight: 12 to 42 pounds | Colors: Dark gray

Best Modernized: Bowflex SelectTech 840 Kettlebell

4.8
Bowflex SelectTech 840 Kettlebell

Best Buy

What We Like
  • Adjustable

  • Ergonomic handle

  • Space-saving design

What We Don’t Like
  • Expensive

  • Membership required for workouts

Kettlebell workouts are nothing new—think 19th-century circus "strongman" training—but Bowflex's take on the exercise is anything but old-fashioned. The space-saving SelectTech 840 effortlessly adjusts its resistance between 8 to 40 pounds, and you can use it with on-demand, trainer-led sessions at home or on the go. We're giving this thoughtfully designed, tech-forward kettlebell extra points for its powder-coated, ergonomic handle.

Material: Powder-coated composite | Weight: 8 to 40 pounds | Colors: Black

Best Adjustable: Titan Fitness Adjustable Kettlebell

Titan Fitness Adjustable Kettlebell

Amazon

What We Like
  • Ergonomic handle

  • Flat bottom

  • Space-saving design

What We Don’t Like
  • Expensive

This all-in-one kettlebell can be set to six different weight increments between 10 and 40 pounds, and you can easily adjust it by adding or removing the drop plates. It's made of powder-coated cast iron and has a wide ergonomic handle to ensure a comfortable, sturdy grip. We also appreciate the anti-rolling flat bottom and overall space-saving design.

Material: Powder-coated cast iron | Weight: 10 to 40 pounds | Colors: Black

Best for Beginners: Weider Cast Iron Kettlebell

Weider Cast Iron Kettlebell

Walmart

What We Like
  • Affordable

  • Easy to grip

What We Don’t Like
  • Not powder-coated

If you're a kettlebell novice or want to reap the muscle-toning benefits of low-weight, high-rep strength training, go with the 5-pound or 8-pound option from Weider. While it's not powder-coated, it features a wide handle and a hammered finish for a better grip.

Material: Cast iron | Weight: 5 to 100 pounds | Colors: Dark gray

Best Single: Blogilates Iron Kettlebell

Blogilates Iron Kettlebell

Target

What We Like
  • Aesthetically pleasing

  • Flat bottom

  • Versatile

What We Don’t Like
  • Handle isn't rubberized

According to fitness instructor Emi Gutgold, "You can get a kick-ass full-body workout with a single weight." If you're buying only one, go with this millennial pink and gold beauty. It's made of rubber-coated iron and features a steel handle. With this versatile, aesthetically pleasing kettlebell, you can build muscle, improve your balance, and even sneak in a little cardio by increasing your heart rate.

Material: Rubber-coated iron, steel | Weight: 15 to 20 pounds | Colors: Pink, coral

Best Pair: Tru Grit Cast Iron Kettlebell (2 pack)

Tru Grit Cast Iron Kettlebell

Amazon

What We Like
  • Easy to grip

  • Flat bottom

  • Comes in a pair

What We Don’t Like
  • Only one weight per pair

These classic kettlebells weigh in at 10, 15, or 20 pounds. They're made of cast iron and feature a continuous powder coating for a comfier, anti-slip grip, plus a flat bottom to prevent rolling. You can hold one in each hand while doing lunges, squats, bicep curls, or lateral shoulder raises. Or grab one at a time and perform swings and other traditional kettlebell moves to improve your explosive strength.

Material: Powder-coated cast iron | Weight: 10 to 20 pounds | Colors: Black

Best Set: ProForm 3-Piece Kettlebell Kit

ProForm 3-Piece Kettlebell Kit

Kohl's

What We Like
  • Easy to grip

  • Stand included

  • Versatile

What We Don’t Like
  • Outdated workout DVD

ProForm's multi-weight set comes with three kettlebells weighing 5, 10, and 15 pounds. They're made of PVC (polyvinyl chloride), a super-strong thermoplastic, and filled with sand. We like that the entire kettlebell is coated in textured vinyl to safeguard your floors and provide a comfortable, sturdy grip. It comes with a workout DVD, but if you're like most Americans and no longer own a DVD player (or never did), you can find tons of tutorials and on-demand sessions online.

Material: Vinyl-coated PVC, sand | Weight: 5 to 15 pounds | Colors: Black

Best Ergonomic: Fitness Gear 23 lbs. PVC Kettlebell Set

Fitness Gear 23 lbs. PVC Kettlebell Set

Dick's Sporting Goods

What We Like
  • Easy to grip

  • Wide handle

  • Flat bottom

What We Don’t Like
  • May be too light for advanced users

Proper form is crucial for avoiding injury, especially when using heavier weights, and it can also lead you to better, faster results. With this in mind, this three-piece kettlebell set boasts an ergonomic design to help you perform swings, cleans, windmills, and other explosive moves as comfortably as possible without straining or pulling a muscle. The vinyl-coated handle is not only grippy but also wide enough to fit both hands while doing two-handed swings and front lateral raises.

Material: Vinyl-coated PVC, sand | Weight: 5 to 10 pounds | Colors: Pink, teal, purple

Best Handle: Amazon Basics Vinyl Coated Cast Iron Kettlebell

Amazon Basics Vinyl Coated Cast Iron Kettlebell

Amazon

What We Like
  • Affordable

  • Easy to grip

  • Wide handle

What We Don’t Like
  • Vinyl prone to tearing

A good handle is arguably just as important as a kettlebell's shape and weight. We like this vinyl-coated cast iron option from Amazon Basics, which features a curved, textured handle to provide a solid grip. Not only that, but it's wide enough to accommodate two-handed moves. This reasonably priced kettlebell comes in eight sizes ranging from 10 to 40 pounds, each in a different color to help you quickly identify the one you need.

Material: Vinyl-coated cast iron | Weight: 10 to 40 pounds | Colors: Yellow, green, pink, orange, red, purple, teal

Best Ring: Bala The Power Ring

Bala The Power Ring

Amazon

What We Like
  • Soft silicone coating

  • Versatile

What We Don’t Like
  • Only one weight available

The Power Ring isn't technically a kettlebell, but this dumbbell-alternative free weight can be used for many of the same moves. We're talking swings, cleans, deadlifts, weighted squats, and shoulder raises—to name just a few. Made of recycled steel and coated with baby-soft silicone, this 12-inch ring is comfortable, grippy, user-friendly, and versatile. The chic color options don't hurt either.

Material: Silicone-wrapped steel | Weight: 10 pounds | Colors: Charcoal, blush, sand, sage, blue, sparkly gray, dove gray

Final Verdict

Overall, we like the Yes4All Vinyl Coated Kettlebell Set, which includes three or six weights of varying sizes, each made of vinyl-coated cast iron with an easy-to-grip textured handle. On a budget? Go with the wallet-friendly choice, Unipack's Powder-Coated Cast Iron Kettlebell.

What to Look For in a Kettlebell

Material

Kettlebells come in a variety of different materials. Cast iron is the most common material and is beloved for its durability. However, you can also find kettlebells with a vinyl or PVC coating. These are great as they can feel more comfortable to grip while working out. You can also consider finding a soft kettlebell instead of a soft one. A soft kettlebell is quieter and can prevent any floor damage if you happen to drop it.

Adjustability

You'll most likely want to have kettlebells with various weights. Traditionally, you can purchase kettlebells individually (and purchase heavier ones as you build your strength over time) or in a set. However, some designs allow you to adjust the weight, so you only have to make a single purchase one time.

Handle Width

The last thing you want is for your kettlebell to slide out of your hands while you're working out. Aside from the vinyl and PVC coatings we've mentioned, you can also look for a wide handle. Not only will this make it more comfortable to grip, but it will also be roomy enough for you to hold it with both hands.

FAQ
  • What do kettlebells do for your body?

    Kettlebells are loved for their versatility and their ability to engage multiple parts of the body in a single workout. In fact, a single swing can target your core, glutes, quads, hamstrings, and back. Currently, research is limited, but it is thought to increase strength, balance, and endurance and can even help relieve musculoskeletal pain.

  • What weight kettlebell should a beginner use?

    Generally, 12 to 18-pound kettlebells are great for beginners, and you can include heavier weights as you increase your strength. It's important not to go into a heavy weight straightaway. There is a proper technique for swinging a kettlebell, and using the wrong weight can cause compensation or muscular imbalances and could lead to serious injury.

  • Should you use kettlebells everyday?

    Generally, it is recommended you work out with kettlebells two to three times per week. You want your body to be able to recover from your workout before engaging in another intense workout session.

Why Trust Byrdie

Theresa Holland is a commerce copywriter specializing in wellness and lifestyle. For this story, she compiled insight from three experts, including two certified personal trainers and one fitness instructor. She then looked at dozens of today's top kettlebells, combed through product specs, and referenced several peer-reviewed articles before landing on her final selections. Theresa has been contributing to Byrdie since 2020, where she covers exercise equipment, fitness apparel, and beauty products.

Article Sources
Byrdie takes every opportunity to use high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial guidelines to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.
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  2. The 15 Best Kettlebells for Your Home Gym. Runner's World. https://www.runnersworld.com/gear/g38528086/top-kettlebells/

  3. bin Yaacob, Najib Majdi & Azwany, Yaacob & Ismail, Ab & che soh, Noor & Ismail, Mohamed & Mohamed, Jan & Hairon, Suhaily. (2016). Dumbbells and ankle-wrist weight training leads to changes in body composition and anthropometric parameters with potential cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences. 11. 10.1016/j.jtumed.2016.06.005.

  4. Lake JP and Lauder MA. Kettlebell swing training improves maximal and explosive strength. Journal of strength and conditioning research vol. 26,8 (2012): 2228-33. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e31825c2c9b

  5. Mayo Clinic Staff. Weight training: Do's and don'ts of proper technique. Mayo Clinic. 26 Nov. 2020. Web.

  6. Is Kettlebell Training Right For You? Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/is-kettlebell-training-right-for-you/.

  7. Meigh NJ, Keogh JWL, Schram B, Hing WA. Kettlebell training in clinical practice: a scoping reviewBMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2019;11:19. doi:10.1186/s13102-019-0130-z

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