Reviewed: The Old-Fashioned Product That Gives You Blowout-Worthy Waves

by Kaitlyn McLintock
PHOTO:

Perfect Hair Collection

“Your hair is not easy to put up with.” This was what I was told by a frazzled, slightly panicked hairstylist last time I went to the salon. I was a bridesmaid in a family member’s wedding and a simple updo took an hour, 74 bobby pins, and half a can of hair spray to complete. My response was something along the lines of “you’re preaching to the choir.”

Ever since I can remember, my ultra thin hair has defied even the best of professional efforts. It slips out of hair ties, bobby pins, and heavy-hold hair sprays to return to its original flat texture. It takes only a few minutes after a curling iron or flatiron leaves my strands for them to return to their original state. And forget about DIY blowouts. It’s just not realistic. Because of this I always envied those who are blessed with naturally bouncy, voluminous hair. I thought I had tried everything to replicate them, that is, until a set of T3 Volumizing Hot Rollers Luxe ($119) came across my desk. 

T3 Volumizing Hot Rollers Luxe ($119)

I was completely new to hot rollers. I never bothered to try them, thinking they were reserved for the hairstyling of older generations (after all, I vaguely remember my grandmother’s set). After unzipping T3’s convenient and très chic carrying case, I knew that I was wrong. The sleek set of 8 black rollers sat gleaming, staring up at me as if promising to end my flat hair woes. I made sure each roller was docked on the base, and then plugged them in. After a few minutes, a light came on, notifying me that the hot rollers were set at the right temperature. 

I was nervous. As much as I love ’80s-era Madonna, that wasn’t quite the look I was going for. I carefully sectioned my hair into four parts. First, I parted my hair down the middle. Then on each side, I sectioned the top from the bottom, as if I was tying two pigtails on either side of my head. Starting at the bottom, I rolled my hair around the rollers, up toward my scalp. If you try this for yourself, make sure to roll your hair in the direction you want it to curl. Finally, I secured the roller to my head with the clips provided. Surprisingly, a full head of hot rollers didn’t feel heavy or bothersome. They were surprisingly comfortable. I took the next ten minutes to start a new Netflix addiction. Then it was time to see the results. 

I simply unclipped the rollers and they all but fell out of my hair, leaving gorgeous, smooth waves behind. Never had I put so little effort in to achieve such stunning results. The texture of my hair changed from rough and dull to silky smooth. And it was so shiny.

I was a little more than impressed, but the real test would come with time; I fervently hoped they’d stick around for more than ten minutes (which is the standard amount of time my hair takes to defect). For the sake of experimenting, I went without hair spray and let my new waves sit naturally. After an hour I went back to the mirror and they were still there. After lunch I checked, and yes, they were still there. After dinner? Still there.

This was unprecedented for me. I had voluminous, soft waves that lasted all day without hair spray. Even better, the styling process was basically effortless. Recently, I’ve found that adding Keratase Keratine Thermique Smoothing Milk ($26) strengthens the hot rollers’ effects. In essence, you could say that I’ve found my hairstyling soulmate in hot rollers, and I know I’ll be breaking these bad boys out weekly. 

Now that you have your new hairstyling product, move to haircare. Read the only three haircare brands worth buying, according to a top hairstylist. 

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